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Program

Program

Sunday, 20 November

19:00
Welcome dinner

(by invitation)

Monday, 21 November

8:30-8:45
Welcome and Introductory remarks

Alexander Duleba, CEEC Director, Slovak Foreign Policy Association 

8:45-10:15
Panel I. Enhancing energy security

Europe’s reliance on imported natural gas from Russia has again been contested by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on 24 February. Unlike the debate after 2009 gas crisis, this time the question of cutting off Russian imports is on the table and specific steps have been made to decrease this dependence. What are the countries doing to increase their energy security and decrease dependence on Russian imports? What is the future of natural gas and oil sectors and nuclear energy without Russian fuels in these countries? How to strengthen the regional energy cooperation and increase resilience? And how can energy security reconcile with EU climate policies?

Speakers
Karol Galek, State Secretary, Ministry of Economy of the Slovak Republic

Q&A

10:15-10:30
Break
10:30-11:45
Panel II. Substituting Russian natural gas

As a reaction to Russian invasion into Ukraine the European Commission proposed a framework of a plan to make Europe independent from Russian fossil fuels by 2027 outlining a series of measures to respond to rising energy prices in Europe and to replenish gas stocks for upcoming season. The EU imports 90% of its gas consumption, with Russia providing around 45% of those imports. While Europe has been facing increased energy prices starting with economic recovery after Covid-19 pandemic, uncertainty on supply only intensified the problem. The solutions were seeking to diversify gas supplies, speed up the roll-out of renewable gases and replace gas in heating and power generation. What has been done in the past months to decrease gas dependence on Russia? Should we invest more into gas storage capacities and LNG terminals? And what challenges are ahead of gas sector?

Chair
Richard Kvasňovský, Executive Director, Slovak Gas and Oil Association

Q&A

12:00-13:15
Panel III. Progress in developments of hydrogen infrastructure

Concerns related to both the energy transition and energy security have been thrown into sharp relief by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Among other clean technologies that would immediately benefit from energy security is hydrogen, for its potential to replace natural gas in hard-to-subside sectors. Described by the International Energy Agency as a “versatile energy carrier” hydrogen has a diverse range of applications and can be deployed in sectors such as industry and transport. Is hydrogen the right answer to energy security and decarbonisation? What are the sectors that could benefit from hydrogen use? How can we produce hydrogen in the region without relying on fossil fuels?

Speakers
Johana Typoltová, Energy, Resources & Industrials, Deloitte Consulting

Q&A

13:15-14:10
Lunch
14:10-15:00
Panel IV. Presentation of the World Energy Outlook

This panel will be held in cooperation with the Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs of the Slovak Republic and the International Energy Agency.

It is a long-running tradition that the International Energy Agency flagship WEO Report is presented at the CEEC conference.

Speaker
Fatih Birol, Executive Director, International Energy Agency

Commentary
Jan Osička, Associate professor, Masaryk University

Q&A

15:00-15:15
Break
15:15-16:30
Parallel Panel V. Industry on the road between free allowances and carbon boarder adjustment mechanism

As part of the EU climate efforts, the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) has been proposed that should prevent the risk of carbon leakage and support the EU’s increased ambition on climate mitigation, while ensuring WTO compatibility. The CBAM will progressively become an alternative to the Emissions Trading System (ETS), which is the world’s first international emissions trading scheme. The European Commission states that ETS has been effective in addressing the risk of leakage but it also dampens the incentive to invest in greener production at home and abroad. How will CBAM approach influence industry´s imports and exports to the third countries? What is the answer to the new system from the industrial players? Is combination of CBAM and free allowances feasible? And what are the barriers to and driving forces for industrial energy efficiency improvements that would lead to decrease of energy consumption in industry?

Chair
Karel Hirman, Member of the Board, Slovak Foreign Policy Association

Speakers
Radovan Ďurana, Analyst, Institute of Economic and Social Studies
Tomáš Jungwirth, Research Fellow, Association for International Affairs

Q&A

15:15-16:30
Parallel Panel V. The Changing Role of the Smart Grid: Effective new approach to grid management, making full use of smart grids and smart grid technologies

This panel will be held in cooperation with Open Smart Grid Protocol Alliance.

Electricity generation from renewable sources will need to increase significantly to achieve the objective of doubling the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix by 2030. Fortunately, there is growing evidence in many countries that high levels of renewable energy penetration in the grid are technically and economically feasible, particularly as solar and wind technologies increasingly reach grid parity in economic terms. However, continuous and expanded growth of the share of renewables in centralised and decentralised grids requires an effective new approach to grid management, making full use of “smart grids” and “smart grid technologies”. In order to expand efforts to enable energy transition in Eastern Europe, updating traditional approaches and principles of the electric power industry by incorporating innovation and modern solutions that have a positive effect on the industry and society are crucial.

Chair
Mark Ossel, Member of the Board, OSGP Alliance, Member European Commission Coordination Group – Smart Electricity Grid

Q&A

16:30-16:45
Break
16:45-18:00
Panel VI. Decreasing use of natural gas in buildings

This panel will be held in cooperation with the Recovery Plan Section at the Government of the Slovak Republic.
Energy efficiency is a powerful instrument for secure clean energy transitions, but it often takes time to deliver major results. Not only dependence on Russian gas, but also high natural gas prices have incentivized EU countries to push for more energy efficiency measures to help decrease Russian gas imports. This panel will discuss short-term and long-term measures that should be deployed to accelerate energy savings and to substitute natural gas in heating sector. What kind of measures should be adopted in order to gain energy efficient results in buildings? Are heat pumps efficient and cost-effective way to heat homes that could replace boilers using gas or other fossil fuels?

Chair
Katarína Nikodémová, Director, Buildings for the Future

Speakers
Ľubica Šimkovicová, President of Passive House Institute Slovakia, Manifest2020
Lívia Vašáková, Director General of the Recovery Plan Department, Government Office of the Slovak Republic

Q&A

18:00-18:15
Break
18:15-19:30
Panel VII. Making use of waste and the secondary materials in cities

The new geopolitical and energy market reality requires us to accelerate the clean energy transition and increase Europe’s energy independence from unreliable suppliers and volatile fossil fuels. The European Commission emphasized that following the invasion of Ukraine, the case for a rapid clean energy transition has never been stronger and clearer. While energy efficiency measures and deployment of renewables are key in energy transition process, use of waste plays an important role in transitioning to a modern, resource-efficient and competitive economy. The European Green Deal waste policy aims to contribute to the circular economy by extracting high-quality resources from waste as much as possible. What measures should be implemented for better usage of secondary raw materials? Should we use more waste for energy purposes? What are the innovative projects in cities in terms of waste usage?

19:30
Concluding remarks

Veronika Oravcová, CEEC Executive Director, Slovak Foreign Policy Association